Have You Taken My Advice?

This year I’ve written blogs entitled “Don’t Panic”, “I Hope You Didn’t Sell”, “It’s Still Not Time To Panic”, “Tech Stocks On Sale” and “The Market Continues To Climb A Wall Of Worry”, to name a few. Do you see the trend? Throughout the year I’ve urged my newsletter and blog readers, as well as my clients, to simply sit tight, ignore the pundits, and maintain their equity positions. There has been nothing to dissuade me that domestic equities are the best investment category for most investors this year.

And as I sit here moments after the market opened, the #DJIA is trading just over 17,000, again within spitting distance of its all time closing high of 17,138.20 set on July 16. Even better, the #S&P500 is less than two points from its closing high of 1,988.31 set on July 23. The tech heavy #NASDAQ is over 4,500, its highest level in 14 years, and approaching the all time high closing price of 5,048.62 set at the height of the tech bubble on March 10, 2000. Without question, the bull market remains in force.

Why have I been so sure about my position to remain fully invested in the face every foreign and domestic problem, both economic and political? It’s very simple: the Federal Reserve and its easy money policy. As long as their accommodative monetary remains in place, there is no reason to contemplate selling. And I believe there will be no policy changes until the second quarter of next year, at the earliest. They will err on the side of waiting too long to raise rates, and possibly allow inflation to grow more rapidly than they would prefer, rather than risk putting the brakes on economic growth.

Even when they do begin to raise rates, which they will likely do in a VERY measured fashion, I believe the market can continue to rise, because it will be confirmation that the economy is improving, and that is good for business, which is good for stocks. But that will be an argument for next year. For now, my advice remains the same: stay the course. Ignore the Talking Heads and tune out the blather. Buy the dips. Own quality stocks and reinvest your dividends. This is the best way to save an invest for your future.

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The Market Continues To Climb A Wall Of Worry

As I write this 10 minutes before the market opens after the Memorial Day weekend, the Dow Jones Industrial Average stands at 16,606, down a mere 110 points from the record high established on May 13. On the other hand, the Dow Jones Transportation Average registered a new high of 7,986 on Friday, the same day the S&P 500 closed over 1,900 for the first time. So as you can see, things are remarkably good. Yet if you listen to the news or watch the TV, the mood does not match the reality. It appears to me that the majority of market observers are negative on the market. The commentary continues along the themes of fear and caution with many “experts” suggesting that the market is primed for a collapse. In the face of all this general pessimism, the market continues to gain ground, or “climb a wall of worry”. If sentiment remains this gloomy while the market remains at such lofty levels, I believe the market will continue to rally to ever higher levels.

Indeed, I believe that the market should end the year higher than it began, perhaps by as much as 10%. With that overarching belief in mind, I remain fully invested in my own accounts and on behalf of my clients. I don’t attempt to trade the short-term movements; rather, I look to buy the securities I want when opportunities present themselves. And I only buy things I believe will out perform the broad market for at least the next three- to five years. If I don’t have that confidence, I don’t buy it.

I also think that the battering endured by the biotech and high growth technology sectors may be over, suggesting that it could be time to nibble at some stocks in those sectors. Many prior high-flyers dropped between 25% and 50%, or more in a very short period of time. It also may be time to look at some downtrodden housing stocks as the housing numbers are expected to perk up over the next few months. Finally, as a core holding, the value sector, as represented by dividend-paying, blue chip stocks continues to be a smart place to put your money for excellent long-term returns. Indeed, that’s where the bulk of my own money is invested.

I Hope You Didn’t Sell Last Month

Last month I wrote a blog entitled “Don’t Panic” on February 5 in which I stated that “I believe that this is simply a long overdue correction in a bull market that began in March 2009 and remains in place today.” As it turns out I was fortunate enough to have written this the day that the correction ended. Since that time, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has risen by 6.2% to within a scant 200 points of its all time closing high. At the same time, the S&P 500, the Wilshire 5000 and the Russell 2000 have all exceeded their old records. Clearly, the Bull Market remains in force and that the modest correction has ended.

So where do things stand now? At this moment, the market is still in a clear uptrend. Almost every major stock average is at or near record levels. Treasury yields have stabilized in the range of 2.60 – 2.80%. The value of the dollar index has fallen about 5% since last July and is currently trading near its low. This is helping to increase the relative prices of gold and silver, as well as other commodities, like crude oil.

So what should we be doing? All things considered, we sit tight but remain vigilant. There will likely be more one-off events like what’s going on in the Ukraine that will cause the market to slide. I believe that one- or two-day events like that can create short-term buying opportunities. Unless there is a fundamental and abrupt change in Federal Reserve policy with regards to interest rates, or if our economy were to quickly worsen, or should there be a major conflagration somewhere in the world, then the stock market should continue to work its way higher.

As for me and my clients, we remain fully invested in companies that are participating in this bull market. We didn’t sell last month and we won’t panic the next time the market drops a little because we understand that markets go up and down in the normal course of things. We are patient investors with the courage of our convictions. That’s how you build true wealth.

The Bull Is Running: So Says Dow Theory

Three and a half weeks into 2013 the Bull is solidly in control of the market. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 are both closing in on the all time highs set back in 2007. The Nasdaq has surpassed the 2007 levels but remains well below the all time high from 2000. Interestingly, the Dow Jones Transportation Average has just blown past its previous record to achieve a new all time high. All of this has occurred in the face of continued economic uncertainty, record high federal debt levels and an upcoming legislative battle over the debt ceiling and the deficit.

In addition to writing this blog, I also pen a free monthly newsletter called “News and Views”. (Simply drop me a note and I’ll add you to the distribution list). Part of my monthly content includes analyzing a bunch of charts for clues on the direction of the market. This very basic technical analysis includes a discussion of Dow Theory, first proposed by Robert Rhea and George Schaeffer, based on the work of Charles Dow. At its core, the theory describes big, medium and small trends in the market. In order for the trends to be validated, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) and the Dow Jones Transportation Average (DJTA) must be setting concurrent highs or lows.

So, according to Dow Theory, where are we right now? The easy answer is that the market is decidedly bullish. The DJIA and DJTA are both at multi-year, or all-time highs right now, having moved higher every day this week. This suggests that, in the near term at least, there should be further gains ahead. The bullish trend will remain in force until both averages move lower and fall through support to interim lows.

There are other indicators, like NYSE Bullish Percent Index and the Volatility Index (VIX), that suggest that the market may be a little ahead of itself and in danger of a correction. Even if that happens, it wouldn’t necessarily mean the end of the bullish trend. Dow Theory says that the primary trend of the market remains in force until it isn’t. So we’ll just have to keep watching for clues as to the health market. For now, the bull is running.