Thoughts after the RNC and the DNC

(Disclaimer – I am a moderate, centrist Democrat; seemingly an endangered species.)

The parties are over in Cleveland and Philadelphia as both the Republican and Democratic National Conventions have have packed up and gone home. The cameras are gone, the balloons and confetti have been swept away and the placards have been sent out on the campaign trail. All that’s left now is the sprint to election day. Each side has their passionate  and detractors, whose votes are unlikely to be swayed, no matter what is said or done in the next three months. As a result, both candidates must now search in the middle for enough votes to put them over the top.

Before the conventions began I already knew that I would be voting for Hillary, which was as much a vote against Trump as for Hillary, but I still wanted to hear what the candidates and their supporters had to say, and to get a feel for the mood of each party. I believe you can glean a lot about a candidate, and what type of president they will be, by the agenda they lay out in their stump speeches, assuming of course, that anything they say can be believed. Like him or not, agree with him or not, President Obama laid out the objectives for his candidacy at the convention, and that’s basically what’s he’s attempted to accomplish over the past eight years. It has been similar for past presidents. So what do we make of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton after the conventions?

I watched the speeches by all of the main players on both sides of the aisle, including, obviously, the candidates themselves. My overriding impression from the RNC was one of hate, ugliness, divisiveness and fear. Without being able to present any record of achievement in governance, or public service of any kind, Trump and his supporters chose to appeal to the lowest, most primal instincts of the disaffected members of our society. Rabid dog snarling fits from Rudy Giuliani and non-stop nastiness from pit-bull Chris Christie set the negative tone for the entire convention. Only the speeches from Trump’s wife and children leavened the proceedings at all. And while I thought that his children all did a very good job, it did not alter my perception of the man or his supporters.

Then there was Trump’s long-winded homage to himself. I think it’s pretty amazing that he plans to solve all of the world’s problems all by himself. He is so delusional, and egotistical, that he appears to truly believe that he, and he alone, has all of the answers to all of the problems that we face. If it weren’t so scary it would be laughable. And yet his supporters, some of whom are good friends of mine, eat it up. And I just can’t understand it. Are they not listening to the same words, spewing forth from that same orange face, that I am? Do they not hear the bile, the anger, the hatred, the intolerance, and the extravagant love of self in everything that he says? It’s a good thing we have a First Amendment to protect freedom of speech, at least until Trump sues someone for saying something negative about him. Even now. Trump has gone on the attack against Michael Bloomberg, a former mayor of New York that Trump formerly supported, for having the audacity to speak ill of The Donald at the convention. Never before has a candidate slung so much mud at his detractors.

After all the yelling, pontificating, name-calling and finger-pointing during the RNC, dispensed with almost a complete lack of any substantive proposals for how to fix all of the problems they decried, I was ready for a change of pace from the DNC, and they did not disappoint. I found the speeches, particularly those of Cory Booker, Michelle Obama, Joe Biden, Bill Clinton and President Obama, to be positive, inclusive, empowering and uplifting. The messages were forward-looking and upbeat, which was in severe contrast to the dire, negative and often hateful words being shouted at us in Cleveland. In truth, after four days in Philadelphia, I found myself feeling much more positive about voting for Hillary than I did before the convention began. And even more convinced, if that is possible, that electing Donald Trump, would be an unmitigated disaster for our country.

Trump has made a career out of self-promotion, flouting the rules whenever possible, looking out only for himself and showing interest only in his net worth. He has driven numerous businesses into bankruptcy. In fact, his entire empire teetered on the verge of collapse before being saved by some sympathetic lenders. He has also attempted to cheat on his taxes here in Westchester Country by claiming that his golf courses are worth almost nothing for property tax purposes, while at the same time lauding their tremendous value when boasting about his net worth. All this does is hurt the communities in which those properties reside by withholding necessary funds that would otherwise go to social services or school programs.If he’s so proud of the billions that he claims that he’s worth, he shouldn’t be so callous as to skim needed funds from the towns and cities that he works with. And speaking of his purported billions, when is he going to make his tax return public, like all the other candidates?

There is no question that Donald has done a great job creating the “Trump” brand, building golf courses around the world and developing and branding luxury properties. And while not all of his ventures have succeeded, that shouldn’t be held against him as failure is often the result of entrepreneurial effort. Unfortunately, none of his successes in business, such as they are, qualify him to be the President of the United States. The truth is that he is short-tempered, mean-spirited, thin-skinned and ego-maniacal. None of these characteristics are what you want in a president.

Can you imagine him trying to negotiate a bill with Congress, or a treaty with Mexico or China? What rapport do you think a man born into significant wealth, who hasn’t done anything for anyone other than himself his entire life, has with the middle-class or Middle America? What has he done to support workers, people of color, or those without enough education to apply for a job at a Trump construction site, or enough to eat to afford a phony Trump education? What kind of man says the misogynistic, racist, ugly and bullying things he says, then threatens to sue anyone who confronts him? Again, is that really who we want to lead our nation for the next four years?

Contrast all of this with Hillary Clinton, who is by no means a perfect candidate. And for some reason, many people (myself included, to some extent), just dislike her. I can’t put my finger on exactly why that’s the case, but it seems to be true. Could it be the qualities in her that we don’t like would otherwise be acceptable if she was a man? Or perhaps it’s that she has simply been in the public eye for so long and it’s easier to find fault with her than appreciate her good qualities. Either way, her seeming lack of “likability” certainly doesn’t disqualify her from the job as there have been many highly unlikable people that have held elected office and done a very good job. And she has certainly made her fair share of mistakes over the past few years, most notably with Benghazi and her emails. But let’s put that aside for a moment as the issues have been beaten to death. And remember, show me any public figure who has not made decisions, or taken actions, that they would later regret. That’s simply the nature of the beast. I believe candidates should be viewed not for a single event, but for the totality of their service.

So let’s put aside the negatives and instead consider a woman who has dedicated her entire adult life, more than 40 years, to selfless public service. Ponder that for a moment, and contrast it with a lifetime of self-promotion for Donald Trump. She has battled to give a voice to the voiceless and to help the helpless. She has fought for education, healthcare, women, children, minorities and virtually every other citizen of our country. She has worked with our military as well as the leaders of almost every country in the world. Is she perfect – no. But I would take her 40+ years of service against his 40+ years of self-aggrandizement any day.

So who do you want negotiating trade deals on our behalf? Who do you want working with Congress (notice I said “working with Congress”, rather than trying to do it all by himself) to create more jobs? Who do you want with their finger on the trigger of our nuclear arsenal? Who do you want to speak for your daughters, sisters, wives and mothers? Who do you want to protect your right to love whoever you want? Who do you want to fight for some reasonable, enforceable gun legislation, so that we can begin to minimize the almost daily occurrences of horrific mass shootings?

The Democrats do not have all the answers, and I don’t agree with all of the planks of their platform. I would prefer a different approach to taxes and business, but I can live with it as Congress will prevent anything too extreme from being passed. I also don’t agree with a free education; there should be some cost involved so each student feels accountable for their efforts and actions. But there’s no question that higher education should be more affordable and shouldn’t leave student deep in debt upon graduation. But looking at the big picture – climate, Supreme Court, women’s rights, human rights and more – I believe Hillary and the Democrats are on the correct side of the key issues that transcend the individual; that affect all of humanity.

Finally, I strongly believe that we must vote for Hillary Clinton in the upcoming election. There is simply no justification for a Trump presidency. He is not a symbol for change. He is a vote for division, isolation, bullying, chaos and nastiness. And that is not an environment in which I want to live, or raise my family. I hope that, over the course of the next three months, the majority of Americans will really listen to what Trump has to say, and how he says it, so that they will wake up and see him for who he truly is. If they do, then his candidacy is doomed and Hillary Clinton will be our next president.

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What I’m Thinking Today

In honor of the extra day in February this year, and on the eve of Super Tuesday, I thought it was a good time to jot down some random thoughts on the market, the economy and the election. So, in no particular order, here goes . . .

  • I hope you listened to my pleas in the last few newsletters not to panic and sell your quality holdings into the correction. If you didn’t, you’ve enjoyed a gain of almost 1,000 since a bottom was made on February 11.
  • I don’t think February 11 was “the bottom” for the year. We’re likely to have at least one, if not two more, corrections this year. That being said, I do believe the market will be higher over the next few years.
  • I would substantially overweight, or even limit, your investments to blue-chip, dividend paying, U.S.-based equities as most of the rest of the world is a mess and income is at a premium.
  • Although I’m happy to see oil prices firming above $30 I don’t think the pain is over. There is still way too much oil sloshing around the world and not enough demand to soak it all up. When the stories of bankruptcies in the oil patch begin to dominate the national media, that will be time to start buying stocks in the energy sector.
  • Large-cap pharmaceutical and biotech stocks have been too beaten up; some great values are starting to present themselves.
  • There is almost zero chance the Federal Reserve will raise rates this year. The greater chance is that they’ll cut rates, although I don’t think that will happen either, at least not in the next few months.
  • When times get scary, and you aren’t sure what to do, it’s ok to do nothing. Outside of some family accounts, in which I bought some stocks during the downturn in January (which proved too early), I have made next to no trades in 2016. And that’s just fine. Sometimes the best trades are the ones you don’t make.
  • When you’re an investor, it’s paramount that you recognize that markets go up and down. There are good times and bad. Up cycles and down cycles. The sooner you accept reality the better. Then you’ll be able to accept the down down with some equanimity and the good times with humility. Investing properly is a marathon, not a sprint.
  • The stock market does not like uncertainty and one of the greatest uncertainties right now is the election. Notwithstanding Bernie’s surprising resilience, I think most people would agree that Hillary will be the Democratic nominee for President.
  • Less certain, though increasingly likely (and I can’t believe I’m writing this), is that Donald Trump will be the Republican nominee. If he sweeps the majority of the #SuperTuesday states tomorrow, his coronation will be virtually assured. And no sane person could really want that to happen. The closer Trump gets to the presidency the more likely the stock market is to be rattled. And that’s not good.
  • All of the Trump supporters out there who think a vote for Trump is a vote for change (“throw the bums out”) and that he will “Make America Great” again, should stop for a minute, listen closely to what he’s actually saying (or more to the point, what he’s not saying) and ask if he is really the person we want leading this country for the next four years. Perish the thought.
  • Tell the important people in your life how much they mean to you. Spend more time with your friends and your kids. Go out and do the things on your bucket list. Don’t wait to drink that great bottle of wine. Life is too short and too precious to waste a moment of it.
  • Give more of your time and/or your money to those less fortunate and count your blessings for how lucky you are; I do every day.

I’m Back – Time To Speak Some Truth

After a long absence from blogging, it’s time for me to return to writing more frequently. Between the upcoming election and the turmoil in the stock market, there is plenty to write about. So let’s get to it.

To start things off, I’d like to comment briefly on the election. I will certainly be writing at greater length and frequency in the coming months.(Disclaimer: I am a registered Democrat with fiscally conservative leanings, so nobody is speaking for me in this process.)

On the Republican side, I must admit that I’m surprised that The Donald has made it this far. I completely discounted, and underestimated, the appeal of this loudmouthed buffoon. That being said, it looks like he’ll stick around for a while. I’m also surprised by the appeal of the religious zealot, Ted Cruz. There is very little hope for a centrist candidate in this field of “how far right can we lean” candidates. Iowa and New Hampshire managed to winnow away almost all of the pretenders; Ben Carson remains the only Walking Dead remaining in the Republican Field. I imagine he will be gone by the end of the month. That will leave Trump, Cruz, Rubio, Kasich and maybe Bush to wage battle into March. My intuition says the Bush will be the next one to go, leaving the Final Four to duke it out over the remaining few months until the nomination.

The picture on the Democratic side isn’t much better. All of the pretenders have already dropped out of the race, leaving the equally unappealing Hillary and Bernie. Notwithstanding his big win in New Hampshire, I still don’t think Bernie has any chance of getting the nomination. Which means a very flawed Hillary Clinton will likely oppose an equally flawed (and potentially very scary) Donald Trump or Ted Cruz in the general election. The prospect of having to choose between either one, knowing that the winner will become President of the United States has me rethinking my citizenship.

So what is a fiscally conservative, socially liberal voter to do? Well, outside of the slim possibility that Michael Bloomberg will run, I honestly don’t know. I’m not optimistic. And I believe that collectively, the stock market feels like I do. I think a lot of the poor stock market action can be attributed to the uncertainty surrounding a presidential election with no good candidates. And if that’s true, we could be faced with months of market turmoil ahead. Add to that the slowing growth in China, the plunging price of oil, currency devaluation around the globe and a relatively weak domestic economy and you have a recipe for stock market disaster.

That being said, I want to be clear about something. It is not time to panic. Things are not nearly as dire as they were leading up to the crash in 2008. Outside of the negative consequences of a too-strong dollar, corporate revenues, profits and balance sheets are in very good shape. It is part of the normal and natural part of the stock market cycle that after a prolonged period of gains that we must experience a year or two of negative returns. Then, when the gloom and despair have peaked, it will be time for the next rally to begin.

So stick with your plan. In the world of virtually zero interest rates, owning a diverse basket of blue-chip, dividend-paying stocks, returning an average yield of at least 2%, is your best way to secure your financial future. So buckle up and prepare for a bumpy ride. I’ll try my best to guide you along the way.

Will the Republicans Actually Close the Government?

At midnight on Monday we will find out if the hard-liners within the Republican party (read: the Tea Party) will follow through on their threat to close the government as they refuse to negotiate in good faith on a deal to expand the debt ceiling. Whether one agrees with ObamaCare or not, I think it’s reprehensible that the right-wing members of the Republican party led by Congressman Ted Cruz of Texas, seeks to draft policy after losing the election, rather than focus on what is important right now: ensuring that the government can pay its bills. Now is not the time for extreme partisan politics. Now is the time for statesmanship; for cool heads to find common ground and a compromise that is in the best interests of the country.

I’ve ranted countless time in my newsletter, this blog and my twitter feed about the gutless and selfish sycophants that pretend to be our leaders in Congress. I won’t bore you by repeating the same withering criticisms. Suffice it to say that these morons are once again holding America hostage as their inability to put aside partisan politics in order to draft a federal budget leaves us a scant three days shy of a partial government shutdown. I can make an argument that, in certain circumstances, it wouldn’t be a bad thing for the government to close for a while. I do believe that we’d all be better off with a much small federal government. But that’s a conversation for another day. In this case though, it would be a very bad thing for all concerned. I still hold out hope that a deal will be struck before October 1 as our Congressional leaders are concerned first and foremost with their own re-election, and to be blamed for shutting down the government won’t help any of them at the ballot box.

As I write this about 30 minutes after the market opened for trading on the last day before the weekend, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is down about 100 points thanks to all of the uncertainty regarding the fight to raise the debt ceiling and agree on a budget for fiscal 2014. The Treasury Secretary has stated that the government will run out of money no later than October 17 and will thereby begin to default on its debts. Before that there will likely be furloughs and other cost cutting measures employed to stretch the deadline out as long as possible. None of those measures are likely to be good for workers or for an already weak economy.

I don’t believe that a crisis will come to pass. I think that the moderates in the Republican party will bring the extremists to heel and that a deal will get done. I do think the Democrats will have to agree to some spending cuts to get a budget deal done. But I don’t believe that any aspect of ObamaCare will be on the table, although the inter-party fight over this legislation will likely continue for the remainder of this Presidency. Hopefully the budget will include a combination of spending cuts and tax enhancements that will make a meaningful impact on the deficit.

So what does this mean for investors? I think the market will likely close lower today, and losses could continue through the close on Monday. I think a stop-gap measure will be agreed to sometime Monday night, allowing the government to continue in business. That agreement will likely trigger a rally in the market. Therefore, I think Monday may provide a nice buying opportunity. Stay tuned.

The Gutless Weasels Win The Day Again

The gutless weasels in Washington once again displayed their partisan colors yesterday by failing to pass legislation requiring slightly more stringent background checks before purchasing guns. This would have in no way limited the right of anyone to buy a gun, nor would it in any way have infringed on our vaunted 2nd Amendment rights, no matter what the irrelevant Sarah Palin had to say. It would simply have added one minor step along the way to legally purchasing a firearm, thereby adding one small layer of protection that might have prevented another tragedy like Columbine or Newton. It is beyond understanding how out of touch our elected officials are with the wishes of the majority of Americans, and how in the pocket they all are with the special interests like the NRA who threaten their precious re-election. They should all be ashamed and voted out of office at the next opportunity.

It’s a sad day when our elected officials fear the power wielded by narrow special interest groups like the NRA  and the GOA (Gun Owners of America), more than they do the majority voice of a nation of voters. It’s time that we the majority raise our voice and demonstrate our power. In the next election, we should vote out the flunkies gun lobby and vote in men and women who will vote their conscience and do the right thing.

I am in no way saying that we should take away guns, or limit the legal right of our citizens to protect their home or family with a firearm should they so choose. Rational gun control is not gun eradication. This is not about the 2nd Amendment. And by the way, the Founding Fathers never, in their worst nightmares, envisioned the types of fully automatic weapons with massive cartridges that are available today. There should be sensible restrictions on how, and from whom, guns can be purchased, and the type of gun that should be available to normal citizens. If not, we can be sure there will be more mass killings in the months and years to come. And when that happens, you can be sure the gun lobby will be out in force saying, once again, that guns don’t kill people.

The following is a comprehensive list of everyone who voted against the bill, except Harry Reid (D-NV) who voted against it purely for procedural reasons. Let’s put an end to their gloating at the voting booth in November.

1. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN)
2. Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH)
3. Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY)
4. Sen. Max Baucus (D-MT)
5. Sen. Mark Begich (D-AK)
6. Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)
7. Sen. John Boozman (R-AR)
8. Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC)
9. Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA)
10. Sen. Dan Coats (R-IN)
11. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK)
12. Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS)
13. Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN)
14. Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX)
15. Sen. Michael Crapo (R-ID)
16. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)
17. Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY)
18. Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE)
19. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ)
20. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC)
21. Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA)
22. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)
23. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND)
24. Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV)
25. Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND)
26. Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK)
27. Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA)
28. Sen. Mike Johanns (R-NE)
29. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI)
30. Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT)
31. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)
32. Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS)
33. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)
34. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY)
35. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH)
36. Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR)
37. Sen. James Risch (R-ID)
38. Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS)
39. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)
40. Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)
41. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)
42. Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL)
43. Sen. John Thune (R-SD)
44. Sen. David Vitter (R-LA)
45. Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS)

The Cliff, The Deficit and What It Means To You

A few weeks ago (the December 8th entry) I told you that the world wasn’t coming to an end because of the Fiscal Cliff. I said that “it is HIGHLY UNLIKELY that every tax increase and spending cut will, in fact, come to pass. Some compromises will certainly be made by our leaders in Washington, despite the radical bleatings of the far right and far left. Whether the deal is brokered in the next two weeks or the next two months, I’m confident a deal will be made that will leave both sides less than happy but will stave off the worst result, which would be simply doing nothing.

As I predicted, a deal was struck with much fanfare and with thundering applause from Wall Street which rewarded the hack show by staging a huge two-day rally. That’s the good news. The bad news is that the deal accomplished virtually nothing for the long-term health of our economy. It is simply a tiny band aid on a festering wound. It feels better now but it does nothing to stop the internal bleeding.

The bigger problem is looming: the fight over the deficit and increasing the debt ceiling. And this time, the Republicans in Congress hold the power. Mr. Obama is going to have to negotiate legitimate spending cuts in Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid and other sacred cows whether he wants to or not. I don’t think there’s really any way to avoid it much longer. It’s time to take the medicine. It’s past time for America to tighten its collective belt and start living within its means. As anyone who runs a household or a business implicitly understands, you simply cannot spend more than you earn, going deeper and deeper into debt. Eventually, you either go bankrupt or someone breaks your kneecaps. I believe the national debt is now approximately $17 trillion, give or take a trillion. It’s time to start to reducing this of our own volition before our creditors force Greece-like austerity measures down the road.

But before we get to the debt ceiling drama, let’s see what the Fiscal Cliff agreement means to you and your money. First of all, if you make less than $400,000 (or $450,000 as a couple), you should be pretty happy. The only real change for you is your payroll taxes will rise 2%. The dividend and capital gains taxes remain at 15% and your income tax levels remain where they are. For those high income citizens, you will face the same 2% payroll tax increase, plus you’ll be subject to a higher tax bracket and capital gains and dividend taxes of 20%. None of this is end-of-the-world stuff. The estate tax exemption remains at $5 million which is good news for everyone. So, in the end, this really isn’t a horrible agreement; it could have been much worse. But the flip side is that while it isn’t bad for people, it’s bad for the government as it actually reduces its long-term tax receipts. Hence the looming fight over the deficit.

And what does all of this mean for our investments? The agreement on the capital gains and dividend tax rates are a plus for the stock market. The higher estate exemption is also good for the market. Any increase in payroll taxes, or income taxes, is a net negative, but it really isn’t a huge problem. So for now, we’re ok. We just need to listen to the rhetoric about the deficit and pay close attention to what kind of spending cuts are forthcoming because that will directly affect the economy, which will immediately impact the stock market. So stay tuned.

Musings on Death and Taxes

Last night my family enjoyed our blended holiday celebration. We shared gifts, laughter and hugs and kisses just days after an entire community was devastated by the horrific act of a madman and less than two months after Superstorm Sandy cut a path of devastation through much of the New York/New Jersey area. There are 27 families in Newton, CT who will not be celebrating the holidays this year as they mourn the loss of their children or siblings or parents. And there are likely hundreds of additional families still homeless or trying to piece their shattered lives back together. It truly makes you appreciate life’s blessings and reminds you to never take them, or your loved ones, for granted.

This random act of senseless violence in the Newton massacre once again brings the issue of gun control front and center. It’s hard to understand how any logical, sane person can oppose the idea of keeping automatic and semi-automatic weapons of mass destruction out of private hands. The Founding Fathers, when they crafted the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution, never envisioned weapons such as these. There is simply no place for them in civilized society. Period. I challenge any gun advocate to reply with a cogent reason why those types of weapons should not be banned. It’s time for our politicians to stand up to the NRA, and the rest of the gun lobby, and loudly proclaim that enough is enough; that they will not be bullied any longer and that’s it’s time for a national debate on what weapons can and cannot be owned by private citizens. President Obama, if you’re reading this, since you are not up for re-election, it’s your job to take a stand and get something done.

And Mr. President, while I have your attention, it’s time to get a deal done on the Fiscal Cliff. Enough is enough. Both sides MUST stop the posturing, eliminate all the partisan BS and craft a compromise that the entire country can live with. It shouldn’t be that difficult. You all have to agree that taxes will go up on many, if not all Americans. And those tax increases will likely be tilted towards those Americans who make the most money. Republicans, just accept it and move on. And at the same time, the government must spend less. There is simply no alternative. Democrats, deal with it and move on. So lock yourselves in a room until an agreement is reached. Because if you can’t get this deal done, then as a nation we are truly screwed because the bigger debate is forthcoming.

What nobody is talking about is that the Cliff negotiations are just the first act in what will be a much more contentious debate over the big issues of what to do with Medicare and Medicaid and Social Security. Those expenditures represent about 41% of the entire federal budget. Throw in another 15% or so for the military and you see that those three programs account for a staggering 56% of the entire $3.5 trillion spent by our government. Cutting a billion here or a billion there is simply noise. We, as a nation, must accept that we have been living well beyond our means for far too long. That unless we want to leave our massive debts for our children and grandchildren to deal with, leaving them with far diminished prospects and lives to that which we’ve enjoyed for so long, we must all make sacrifices for the common good. As a society, are we ready to do that? We’ll find out. And in the meantime, let’s talk about it. Write to me and let me know what you think.